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20121128
20121206
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KQED (PBS) 30
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English 30
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the nine justices that occupy its chambers carry a heavy responsibility. they have the final say on the law of the land. the principles and idea that guide their decisions are the subject of heated debate. justice antonin scalia is the longest serving justice currently on the court, he is the leading voice for a conservative judicial philosophy known as textualism, some talk about it as originalism. it asserts that laws must be interpreted as they were understood by the men who wrote them. in 2006, justice elena kagan, then the dean of hear extraordinary law school, scalia's alma mater says he is the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about law. he originally coauthored a new book, it is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text. i am very honored to have justice scalia back on this program. so the first book was about arguing, how to make the case arguing the case. this is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text written brian a. garner -- >> as the earlier book was. >> rose: exactly. so what did you hope to accompl
make palestine a state. taking the british press to task. the one comes to new laws, not everyone is on board >> we should be wary of any legislation that has the potential to infringe free speech and a free press. >> and mounting faster than -- melting faster than we thought. scientist say that they are rapidly disappearing. now we need to know why. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe and. the united nations has held an historic vote in which palestine has gained the status of an observer state. these are this team -- the saenz right now. it is a sign of global recognition that the palestinians were seeking. israel and the u.s. were opposed. it could delay hopes for achieving an independent palestinian state through peace talks. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton said the vote was unfortunate and counterproductive. >> a landmark day in and often turbulent history. jubilant palestinians to i heard there president demand what he said was their basic right to self-determination. >> the moment has arrived for the world to see cle
, and moore, professor of law. the u.s. supreme court convened today behind closed doors discussing whether or not to review a lower court ruling striking down california's proposition 8. their highly anticipated decision could come monday. as you well know, the supreme court gets seven to eight thousand requests for cases to be reviewed. how do they decide? they only pick 80 or so a year. what is the criteria and why would prop 8 be an important one to look at? >> it's how legal the precedent is and how national the question is, how many people it affects, and relatedly, how much lower courts are struggling over that and related questions. so in the prop 8 case, it's true the prop 8 is a california-specific measure, and it's also true that a ninth circuit ruling tried to make its ruling non-specific. california is such an important state and it occurs in dozens of other states and that's why it might have some appeal for the supreme court. >> as you said, the ninth circuit narrowed it down, but when the court gets it, could they broaden it back up and make it a national ruling? >> indeed,
of law, which is all important? -- how can egypt fulfilled a rule of law, which is all important? >> kurram burk, egypt only have one is -- remember, egypt only have one institution before the revolution, the military. what egypt is trying to do simultaneously is find leaders, build institutions, and meet the aspirations that had been billed very high during a very successful and peaceful revolution. that is not easy. it will take time to build institutions and impose the role of -- the rule of law. >> the ceasefire in gaza, will that help to win egypt friends abroad? >> i think it shows they play a special role in the middle east. and they are regaining their traditional role in the region. it is good as long as the president does not believe he can then take about -- take that and cashed in for a grant of power, which is the concern of some. >> do you think he is the leader to take them into the near future? greta i think he was -- >> i think he was elected democratically in a free and fair election. think of egypt as slowly putting in place all of the various elements of a cou
with this quote, "law and order exists for the purpose of establishing justice. when they fail in this purpose they become the dangerously structured dams that block the flow of social progress." martin luther king jr. wrote those words from a birmingham jail. 50 years later, over 50 million americans live under correctional control. two million are in prison, five times the number of people incarcerated in 1972. a young black man in america has a one in three chance of gog jail at some point in his life. today we asked what mass incarceration means for our society. it raises questions of race, class, and the meaning of justice. joining me, patricia williams. she a law professor at colombia university american work is to examine race in the american legal system. and michelle alexander, her book "the new jim crow" brought the conversation about mass incarceration to a wider johnson. and eugene jarecki, the filmmaker behind the movie requested the house i live inment. when we use the term "mass incarceration" what are we talking about? >> we're talking about a system that function primarily as
to the system do you think are required? how deep? >> please understand that current law, the president's law right now, the law of the land, makes it so that medicare, medicaid and social security all are on a road to insolvency. that's the current law. we believe that those three programs, medicaid, medicare and social security need to be saved and strengthened and secured. through our budget proposal we've had out the last two years we have put forward a proposal that actually makes it so that current retirees, current medicare recipients see no change whatsoever but in fact we save and secure the program for future generations. that the medicaid program which again is on a path to insolvency and states are complaining vociferously about this that we actually save that program from a financial standpoint. there are wonderful proposals on the table about solving and saving social security. you can't address the spending issues without fundamental really form and real solutions for medicare, medicaid and social security. >> brown: just to stay with you, won't those be unpopular? after this e
by the press. >> reporter: but david cameron said the judge had got it wrong. laws controlling newspapers could mushroom into censorship. he said he wanted changes the way newspapers regulate themselves but not new laws. >> the issue of principle is that for the first time we would have crossed the rubicon of writing elements of press regulation into the law of the land. we should, i believe, be wary of any legislation that has the potential to infringe free speech and a free suppress. >> hear hear! >> reporter: describes the phone hacking and other intrusions suffered by innocent victims like millie dougher will, justice leveson depicted a press out of control, those "reckless regard for accuracy" would resist and dismiss complainants almost a matter of course and "showed a recklessness in prioritizing sensational stories almost irrespective of the harm caused, heedless of the public interest." >> good morning. any thoughts today? >> rupert murdoch in new york today, the judge also said there was no evidence to support allegations that there was a grand bargain between the tory leadership and
i did not see, the protesters are claiming is this -- i do not it imposes sharia law across the government. they claim it is not adequate to protect the separation of powers, to keep women in the 21st century instead of the stone age. not one person in the constitutional assembly is female. they say it does not protect it. what i am saying is, get in the game. it is time to go back to the table. i might give this advice to the congress, in our country, go back to the table and hammer it out. if both sides are dissatisfied, that means it is a good compromise. >> i wonder if we're expecting too much of a country that has had two decades of leadership. you point out the american example. it is a very fragile as well. >> of the risks are huge. morsi had two good, impressive successes last week. one of them in -- was brokering a ceasefire in gaza, which is also fragile and holding for now. the second is the effort he has made to get the imf to commit four $0.8 billion in loans with billions from the european union and maybe some money from us, depending on congress, to follow. th
is too much emphasis on islam in the draft. egyptian law should follow the principles of the islamic law, like the old constitution. and this they will protect the true nature of the egyptian family and protect morals and values, something could be used to compose islamic values. they don't like the fact that the constitution has no guaranteed equality of both men and women. as soon as there is a referendum on the constitution, he will give up his controversial powers. >> we are passing through a very short but very important phase. >> nobel prize winner says that the draft constitution should be put in a garbage can of history. and once again, the protesters are forcing noisy opposition. >> they never divided the egyptians, we have no understanding if he is the president of egypt or the of the muslim brotherhood. they can only deepen and hardened was already a danger is divide in egyptian society. >> during this turbulent time, i spoke to times editor at large. on wednesday, they join me from new york. the first collective, what do you make of him? >> is quite remarkable. tens of thousa
, it is not an automatic. if they do pursue citizenship-- which they can under the law as it is today-- they would go behind the people who are already in line so that there is a fairness in the system to those who have waited for years to become regularized. but they will have a preference in that they will be here legally, can work, and build up all of their seniority while they are waiting in the line. >> suarez: senator, would you say the prospects for a bill of this kind have changed? have gotten better since the election? >> i do think that people are now realizing that we've got to have immigration reform and speaking only for myself i believe that doing immigration reform in pieces is going to be achievable rather than trying to do comprehensive which gets bogged down in extraneous issues that make it very hard to come to a total big conclusion. >> suarez: representative gutierrez, today the hispanic caucus laid out a set of principles it would want to see in any immigration reform bills. given what you and the caucus members said today, is the senator's achieve proposal at least a place to b
kate's condition. the government confirmed it will be moving quickly to pass a law ensuring that if their first child is a girl, she will definitely be third in line to the throne. she will not be passed over by any younger brother. >> the old-fashioned rules where only a boy could become the king and his oldest sister would not be allowed to, the rules will be swept aside and that is change, and updating of the rules that many people would welcome. >> alan farthing was spotted. leading the treatment. >> it is one of the worst things i have ever gone through, bar none. it puts your body through minutes you never thought you have. i felt there were times when i felt like my body had been poisoned. >> for william but most particularly for kate, these are testing days. they know there will have the support of their families, of each other, and of millions of people who they have never met. bbc news at the king edward the seventh hospital. >> the duchess of cambridge spending a second night in hospital for morning sickness. it was famously called the fast as talk of jobs in the
cohabitation between their communities. >> rose: a secretary law state with all -- >> a secular state with-- you know, i have a lot of friends, i don't know whether they are alloways or christian or anything else. that is the syria we would like to see back. >> rose: how do you get passed that? i mean because that is the issue in terms of finding a negotiation, that is the hangup for the russians. and its at the same time the hangup for the people who are taking up arms to fight the government. it is when you have this kind of civil war, somebody warrants to win and they want to kick the other guy out. >> sure. you see that you understand. but solutions are about compromises. and then you see what is the greater good. the greater good in syria is for the country to remain united. for the state not to disappear. for people to go back and live together the way they did a long time ago. >> it's hard toast make that argument with people who think they're winning. >> of course. >> even if they are not -- >> to wait it out and they'll get them. even if they are not winning. >> but you know what
't read your email unless regulated by law. there are 33 instances of this in the constitution. it would be, of course, the parliament that writes the law. there's a lot of concern that isn't a longstanding clear contract between the people in the government but really another way for the brotherhood to expand its power grab here. >> brown: nancy yousef of mcclatchy in cairo, thanks so much. >> ifill: we'll continue our conversation series in the days to come. we get a very different take on this. paul krug man is a nobel prize winning economist at princeton university and a columnist for the "new york times." he joins us now. ers kin bowles may be one of the people you have written about in the past who you called deficit... who were touting a phantom menace known as the fiscal cliff. am i right about that? >> fiscal cliff is not a phantom menace. the deficit right now is. the notion that something terrible will happen if we don't deal with the deficit right away. the fiscal cliff is a very different story. that's about reducing the deficit too fast. >> ifill: you call it an austerity b
law says that qualified dividend income tax rates are at 15%. and, if no legislation is passed between now and then end of the year, those rates would go up to as high as 43.4%. >> companies just want to pass along these dividends. it's a thank you to shareholders. it sparks interest in their stock. >> reporter: according to s&p, this month alone 216 companies have declared special dividends. last november only 72 firms decided to make similar payouts. this is not the first time u.s. companies have been so generous. exactly two year ago, there was a significant pickup in the number of u.s. companies declaring special dividends. the threat of higher tax rates for dividends was behind that spike, too. ample cash on a firm's balance sheet is also a common catalyst for special dividends. >> basically, companies don't want to have too much cash. and, if you don't have places to invest, if you don't have good takeover opportunities then they want to shrink the cash. >> reporter: it turns out, companies with insiders who own big chunks of stock such as brown forman are also more inclined towa
. and i drove to my mother-in-law's house to let her verify what i had thought i had seen. and that's what it was. >> sreenivasan: the hills opted for a lump sum payment. after taxes, that comes to $136 million. there's been no official word on who holds the other winning ticket. it was sold in arizona, but a surveillance camera at a convenience store in maryland recorded this man on thursday, checking the numbers and apparently discovering he's the other winner. he did not give his name. wall street had a quiet ending to the week. the dow jones industrial average gained three points to close at 13,025. the nasdaq fell one point to close at 3,010. for the week, the dow gained just a fraction of a percent; the nasdaq rose 1.5%. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: george washington famously described the senate as "the saucer that cools the tea," a body designed to soothe "hot" legislation that emerged from the house of representatives. but as congressional correspondent kwame holman reports, some senators have gotten pretty steamed over a proposed change
warned the syrian government not to use chemical weapons on its people. online, an update to a law in saudi arabia renews a debate about male guardianship. hari sreenivasan has more. >> sreenivasan: now whenever a saudi woman leaves the country, her husband or father receives a text message. the recent changes to the long- held system of male guardianship sparked outrage on twitter recently. i spoke to a journalist in saudi arabia who says the practice reinforces male control. our conversation is in the rundown. today's science roundup features dragonflies, or as one science writer calls them "the bengal tigers of the microworld." find the story on our home page. how can you secure a larger social security payment from an ex-spouse? the answer is in this week's installment of "ask larry." all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll look at turkey's request for nato to deploy patriot missiles along its border with syria. i'm gwen ifill. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online, and again
contracts "require strict compliance with state and federal laws and regulations, including worker safety," and that "worker safety has always been a hallmark of at&t." guilford'siancée, bridget pierce, thinks that no one ultimately took responsibility for guilford's safety. >> nut. >> n-u-t. >> i believe that everybody that is involved should be held accountable. at&t, the contractors, general dynamics and the smaller companies that are subcontracted out. everybody in this process should be held accountable for and have to pay fines and have regulations that they all have to live up to. >> smith: after guilford died, the foreman for all around towers disappeared and was never questioned by osha. the company quickly went out of business, but two of its owners, who declined interview requests, then started another company that continues to do work in the industry. that doesn't surprise those who study subcontracting. >> the problem of focusing the enforcement attention at the bottom, at the small subcontractor, is a little bit like the old game of whac-a-mole. you can enforce your osha st
a that there are the law of unintended consequences is always at work in these situations. >> rose: i have heard you say two things. one is that you begin to worry that your concern about the welfare of the men and women in harm's way, you might have too for lack of a better word, had a stronger place in your decision al structural than it ought to be, am i right about that? >> i became to worry i had become too protective of them. >> rose: secondly you seemed to be saying, i began to worry that we didn't know what would be the consequences and that worried you too. and in some sense of how things could get out of control and that it became -- am i real ng you right on that? >> absolutely. >> rose: so those are the two things when weighing the factors to step down that had weight on the decision to step down now? >> when we look at history for a second -- >> i will give you a concrete example. i opposed the intervention in libya. this is not a vital, this is not of vital national interest, and we are already in two wars, in fact, in the situation room i would say can i just finish the two wars i am alre
most of which at some point in time is going to become law. and the longer we put this off, the deeper the hole gets, so we're trying to focus on how do we get this done now-- >> woodruff: let me ask you about part of your plan. part of it would means test social security, medicare benefits. in order, the benefits would go down for those at the higher income levels. we had the economist paul krugman on the "newshour" last night who said that, you know, not only do the polls show many american oppose, this but he said the benefit you get, the money that would be raised from doing that is really not enough to overcome the pain that he said it would cause lower and middle-income americans. >> well, first of all, it would cause no pain to lower and middle-income citizens because they wouldn't be affected. and i agree, it's only one of the things that needs to occur. it's a small part. there are many manager transformative things that need to happen in social security and medicare and my bill outlines both transformative things to really make them solvent. there's a $27 trillion unfund lieb
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)